About The Latz Report

The Latz Report was launched in September 2019 by publisher Phil Latz. It aims to serve the Australian bicycle industry. It’s goal is to help members of the Australian bicycle industry become more profitable by providing well presented, timely, accurate and unbiased information.

About Phil Latz

Phil Latz started racing bicycles in 1972 at the age of 10. He started a bicycle media business, Bicycling Australia, in 1989, initially with one magazine of the same name. Over the next 25 years this business grew to encompass Mountain Biking Australia, Bicycling Trade, Bicycling Yearbook, the Bicycling Australia Show, Where to Ride cycling guidebooks and a range of other activities. Phil progressively sold parts of the business in to three separate buyers between 2014 and 2017. After two years working as Development Director for We Ride Australia, Phil resigned from that role to found The Latz Report.
Phil progressively sold parts of the business in to three separate buyers between 2014 and 2017. After two years working as Development Director for We Ride Australia, Phil resigned from that role to found The Latz Report.
He also works as a consultant for various organisations and as a business coach. He can be contacted at phil@thelatzreport.com.au or on 02 4225 8372.

About The Logo

The cog with 16 teeth that surrounds the logo is a reference to a very basic magazine called Sprocket that Phil started publishing from the age of 16. Sprocket covered the South Australian road and track racing scene through the early 1980’s. It marks a ‘bookend’ as Sprocket was the first of Phil’s many cycling publications and, if it is successful, then all being well, The Latz Report will be the last.
It’s also an almost universal link to cycling, as most bikes are driven via a rear wheel sprocket.
It also implies leverage, and driving forward, which is hopefully what The Latz Report will help bicycle industry members to do.
The three progressive shades of green also have several meanings. Firstly, the 'T' starts with British Racing Green, associated with racing cars the progression to lighter shades implies that we should also embrace lighter forms of vehicles such as bicycles.
The lightest shade of green used for the 'R' reflects the eucalypt green used in the House of Representatives in the new Parliament House in Canberra. This reflects the national importance of cycling and the need for the cycling community to lobby our federal government to give cycling the support and recognition it deserves.
Finally the three green shades in combination reflect some key benefits of cycling both for our natural environment and for our cities, in which so many Australians live.

The intelligent man is always open to new ideas. In fact he looks for them.

Proverbs 18:15